Commenting Guidelines

Over the years Huzzahnians have worked hard to develop the skills and attitudes that help build global connections through commenting. This year, 2011-2012, Huzzahnians are sharing their thoughts on commenting in a slideshow. What have we missed? Scroll down below the slideshow to read the excellent advice of past students.

Guidelines written by the 2010-11 bloggers of Huzzah!

The purpose of commenting is to connect. We comment a lot: on YouTube videos, on blogs, and face to face–pretty much, we comment all the time. We comment to learn, sometimes from people on the other side of the world. We comment to express our opinions about what has been written. We comment to connect, and to connect we tell stories, use humour, and share our thinking. Remember, you are trying to engage the blogger in a conversation! A good comment can be the beginning of a good blogging relationship. Here is our advice on quality commenting:

Think about your digital privacy:

  • Use your first name only to identify yourself.
  • Leave off your home email, your street address, phone number, or school name.
  • Don’t share specifics of your daily routines that involve time and location (ie where & when your soccer practice is)

Think about the tone of your comment:

  • Be polite, friendly, and encouraging.
  • Have some humour, but be careful with sarcasm.
  • If you disagree, don’t be rude about it; give constructive (helpful) feedback.

Think about the content of your comment:

  • Keep your comment on topic and make sense. Say something about the original post.
  • Don’t say random stuff or get really silly.
  • Be more formal than you would in real life, but not stuffy.
  • Avoid texting shortcuts like u for you and l8r for later, and only use one emoticon if you need to.
  • Sometimes add a question at the end to keep the conversation going.
  • Include your blog url (address) so the blogger knows where to find you.

Think about conventions of your comment:

  • Try to fix your spelling mistakes: use Firefox for drafting your  comments.
  • Use capitals in the right places: people’s names, places, the beginning of a sentence, and on “I” –no evil i’s. All capitals is like yelling.
  • Punctuate properly: period at the end of a sentence, space after a period, comma, or end bracket. One “!” will do: you don’t need a string of exclamation marks.
  • Remember, you are putting your best self forward, so polish your comments.
These commenting guidelines were written in early October of 2010. Want more inspiration and guidance for commenting? Check out this post from the Student Blogging Challenge. Time to pump up those mad commenting skilz!

***

Guidelines written by the 2009-2010 bloggers of Huzzah!

Blogging is about reading, thinking, and responding.

Getting a comment can be like receiving a  little bouquet in your mailbox: a treat for the senses.  Division 4 has been taking a lot of time to read posts and write thoughtful comments. Students brainstormed, discussed,  and determined that the points below are important to keep in mind when commenting on blogs.

Guidelines

  • Make your comment worth reading.
  • Start a conversation.
  • Be positive, interested, and encouraging.
  • If you disagree, be polite about it.
  • Connect with the post: be on topic.
  • Re-read your comment before you hit submit–think before you send!
  • Aim for correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar.
  • Don’t use chat or texting language like lol, i, or u.
  • No “Hi! Visit my blog! Bye!” comments. Be thoughtful.
  • Include your blog url so people can comment back, and use our gmail address, not student webmail.
  • Keep your privacy: no personal or identifying information about you, your family, or your friends. Don’t give out last names, school name, phone numbers, user names, or places and dates you can be found.send me your love Gibsonclaire
Did we miss anything? Let us know what you think.

Image Send me your love by Gibsonclaire

88 comments

  1. Hi!
    This site is really fantastic – thanks for sharing. I’m learning how to blog, and it’s been really helpful to look at how the “professionals” do it!

    1. Hi Emma, welcome to blogging. There is a bit of a steep learning curve initially, but soon you will find yourself ticking along like a pro!
      Best wishes, Jan

  2. Hello! I’m starting a blogging project with my high school Algebra 2 Honors students this year and I’m THRILLED to have found your online posting and commenting guidelines! I’m using many of them with my students (with proper credit, of course). Thank you so much!

    1. Go, Mr. Lipp, Go! We are thrilled that you found them useful and grateful that you are giving credit to the student’s work. If you open up your blog for public viewing at some point, please let us know!

  3. Hey! This is GREAT! I hope you don’t mind but I am going to use your advice to help my students. They have all started blogging this year and today and tomorrow they are learning how to comment. Thank you so much!

  4. I really like what you put together guidelines for commenting. May I use your guidelines on my teacher blog? I will be sure to credit you for your guidelines at the bottom of my page.

    Thank you.
    Mrs. C

  5. I love this blog and I’m going to use it as inspiration for my fourth/fifth graders. I am in the beginnings of starting my class blog. I love the Shelfari widget, but don’t have a clue how to add it to my blog. Advice??

    1. Hi there, Teacher Gal,
      Thank you for the compliment. If you’d like to see some terrific blogs closer to your age, take a look at my sidebar for several blogs under Local Blogs–it’s great to see what other people are doing to think about what might work for your situation.
      If you have a Shelfari account, go to your shelf, and click “put your shelf on your blog”. Then copy the html code that shows up and put it a text widget in your sidebar. If all that is Greek, I suggest following The Edublogger where you’ll find all the tips you need, with turtorials, to get going.
      Good luck,
      ~Jan

      1. Thank you for your suggestion to check out other blogs. There are so many talented teachers out there. Where do you all find the time? I’m going to work on my first post today. I am going to take a video of my class working out “The Locker Problem.” You’ll have to check it out!
        As far as the Shelfari tutorial…it doesn’t sound Greek until you get to adding the html code to a text widget. I’ve added widgets to my blogspot account but I don’t see where to paste a html link in the widget link.
        Thanks again for all your support and inspiration.
        ~Alethea

        1. Hi Alethea, try this from your Edublogs dashboard: Appearance > widgets > drag a text box to your sidebar > open > paste the code > save. If you want to see a teacher working with the same theme, look at Hey, Kids!. You’ll begin to see some of the possibilities. Good luck with your blog!
          ~ Ms. Smith

    1. Hi there, thanks for the compliment! If you do use these guidelines, please link back to this page as it’s a positive pat to give students credit for their work. The process of having your students write their own guidelines is powerful learning, too.

  6. What a great blog. I’m currently researching to get ideas and helpful hints before I start blogging with my own grade. Your site is inspiring and I will certainly be back to visit again.
    Thanks for your great advice!

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