Food, Glorious Food & Wonderful Wikimedia

Miss Wyatt set us a challenge this week that we could really sink our teeth into: writing about foods that Canadians (or at least these Canadians) love. Easy-peasy: no one was lost for words. Check out the delicious posts below.

Albert Roosenboom The tempting cakeWe used the opportunity to learn more about how to use images appropriately in our posts. As we were reminded by Miss Wyatt, we can’t just grab any old image from Mrs. Google–we must have the photographer’s permission. People who want their art, writing, images, or videos to be used and shared by others give their work a Creative Commons (cc) license rather than attach a Copyright (c). Wikipedia has a large and growing collection of such images, linked to its articles, called Wikimedia Commons. We learned how to use these files and give attribution (saying whose work it is) by pasting code into the text tab of our blogs. To see attribution (try it on The Tempting Cake, by Albert Roosenboom, right), mouse over the image; to see the license details, click on the image. Should you wish to try it yourself, the document describing the process is below.

But first, the glorious food posts of my hungry Huzzahnians. Who knew they had such a weakness for poutine?

Food Favourites:

Poutine: Ben, Brooke J., Rowan, Tate, Connor, Harley, Ayla
Maple Syrup: Chantal, Cami Bacon: Alinna, Tyler B.  Salmon: Abby D.
Pancakes: Morgan Doughnuts: Nathan, Hayly Oranges: Kalea
Spaghetti: Kasandra, Elijah Pizza: Tyler M. Sushi: Brooke L.
Fajitas: Rylie Buffalo Wings: Owen Waffles: Autumn, Liv, Abbie
Apple SauceAerin Pies: Talia

Here is the how-to document: [embeddoc url=”” viewer=”google”]

Please take a look at these excellent posts and leave comments for our dedicated bloggers. If you use this how-to file, let me know how it goes. And please remember to leave your blog url (your blog address) in the comments.

Texas: What We *Think* We Know…

One of the coolest things about blogging is that you meet people from all over the world. Mrs. Kriese’s class in Austin, Texas has really set the bar high on getting to know their global neighbours. They have been learning about bloggers in New Zealand, Serbia, and us in British Columbia, with whom they had exchanged comments. First they brainstormed what they thought they knew about us, and then did some first-class research to find out more.

Well, we think that is a great formula. Below are the notes from our brainstorming session. Mrs. Kriese and Grade 7s of West Ridge Middle School–how did we do?

Created with Padlet
We look forward to your comments. Please leave your blog address!

Spooky Halloween Houses!

Halloween Victorian Mansions on PhotoPeach

Don’t go in alone!

These haunted houses were inspired by the work done here and here. We took a look at the features of Victorian homes: asymmetry in structure, a focal point front door, turrets and towers, bay windows, iron railings, roofs made of slate, brick or shingle siding, sash windows, and tell-tale gingerbread woodwork on roof peaks, porch corners, and around doors.

We sketched in pencil first, then went over the drawings with a Sharpie. The backgrounds were done using oil pastels for the ground and moon, followed by a two colour-wash of water colour paint. For detailed instructions, check out Tyler’s post or Abbie’s post.

The results….

The music, Night on Bald Mountain by Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky, adds to the drama, I think!

What do you notice about these houses? Do you like the music or would you have chosen something different?  Have you done any Halloween art this year? If so, leave a comment with your blog address and we will come and take a look.

Cats? Dogs? Or Cats & Dogs?

A Tender Moment
Stephanie via Compfight

 Most people I know like animals. Many LOVE animals. And those who love animals  often have a cat or a dog–or both–or many of both!–for family pets. Sometimes, they have strong feelings about which make better pets, felines or canines.

This week students shared their preferences for these special animal companions, supporting their stance with a list of reasons.   They made their posts pop with Flickr Creative Commons images which they inserted using the Compfight widget. Students are beginning to understand that to use someone else’s creations (writing, photos, audio, video, etc.) you have to have permission and give the person credit (attribution) for their work.

So take a look at these terrific new posts. Click on the names below. Looks like there is a definite bias in favour of barking and panting over meowing and purring.

     Cats      Cats
& Dogs   














Brooke L. 










Tyler B



Tyler M.

Brooke J.




But you have your own opinions, I bet! So agree, disagree, and share you thoughts. These bloggers are waiting to hear from you!

*If you leave a comment, and you have a blog, please include your blog address with your comment (ie so we can visit you. Thanks!*

Judging a Book by Its Cover

I pick up a book and take a look.

For me that’s the first step in choosing a novel. I look at the front cover, read the title, consider the author. Do I know him or her? I read the back cover blurb. Does it grab my attention and make me think? I look for awards or recognitions on the front cover such as the Newbery Medal or the Canadian Library Association Award. If there are reviews on the back cover or inside, I consider them too. I begin to anticipate, predict, infer…

And then I start to read. 

We are going to be taking part in a world-wide event called the Global Read Aloud. That means I will read a book to you, just as thousands of other teachers will do around the world. Through various digital tools we will connect with other classes to share our observations.

Here is our book. Take a look:

(Click images to enlarge)
In your comment below:

  • Describe what you see on the cover–what details (evidence) do you notice and what do you infer?
  • When you read the blurb on the back cover, what do you predict and why (what evidence do you use)?
  • What kinds of feelings does this book stir up?

I look forward to reading your thoughts.


I’m new here.

3670465986_3ac609277d_oWhen you are brand new to something and you want to grow, you can look up to others for examples and guidance. The 2015-16 nest of newbie bloggers doesn’t have to go far to find good models of how to blog well–we have seven years of Huzzahnian Grads to show us how to hatch and grow a blog. From them we can learn much about writing interesting, thoughtful posts, designing inviting blog pages, and commenting in a way that creates a conversation.

Your task:

First, read the Commenting Guidelines written by past Huzzahnians. They capture the big ideas about commenting. They set the standard that we will go by here.

Next, start reading and noticing quality in the blog posts below–you don’t have to read them all–pick one or two. Read the comments below them:

***These are retired blogs; please don’t comment on them as the bloggers likely won’t reply.***

(Are you noticing that blogging is about reading, first?)

Finally, in your comment below: Share one commenting guideline that you think is particularly important and why it is so. (*Hint:* You may have to use the word because.) Then tell us about a post that you read: give the blogger’s name and post title AND a one sentence summary of the content. Then say what you found interesting or inspiring, and showed quality in blogging to you. Also share what you discovered about the comments you read–do they follow commenting guidelines?  (Hmm, your comment is going to be five or more sentences long…one might almost call it a paragraph!)

Huzzahnians, remember to copy your comment into your  Google doc.  Soon you’ll be ready to hatch a blog of your own!

Visitors, if you think you have an exemplary post we should read, include the url (address) in your comment and we will visit and comment.

Photo Credit: CaptPiper via Compfight cc